September is a month tailor-made for sportsmen and women and there is no better place to spend it than on our public lands.

The dog days of summer have given way to cooler temperatures and a multitude of opportunities beckon hunters and anglers: brown trout chasing streamers, elk bugles ringing through the mountains, ruffed grouse bursting from underfoot, brook trout aglow in spawning colors, hatches of blue wing olives, salmon returning home to spawn…

We all have our favorite public lands where we savor these experiences and this September we are celebrating them with 30 Great American Places. Join us as we unveil 30 of our best public lands throughout the month of September and take action to protect America’s hunting and fishing heritage.

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Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National Forest

This North Carolina Gem holds some five hundred miles of fishable trout water in the three sections of national forest; its best known river is the Davidson.

Upper Black River

Upper Black River

The Black may be Arizona’s most celebrated trout fishery. In its upper 35 miles it tumbles through a deep bedrock canyon accented by red rock cliffs and old growth pine. These waters are home to Apache trout, one of the state’s native salmonids.
Chequamegon-Nicolet

Chequamegon-Nicolet

The Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest encompasses the headwaters of three major drainages, 2,000 miles of stream (with almost 1,400 miles of trout water), more than 600 lakes over ten acres in size and 400 spring ponds…plus 324,000 acres of wetlands. All this water is home to more than 50 fish species.
Methow River

Methow River

The Methow Valley is a beloved destination for outdoorsy Washingtonians of all stripes, but in the summer anglers are drawn here in search of the Methow’s wild Westslope cutthroat and rainbow trout.
Pine Forest Range

Pine Forest Range

This rugged high desert landscape ranges from 4,200 to more than 9,000 feet in elevation, and intersperses sagebrush and otherworldly rock formations with dense stands of aspens. It’s home to northwestern Nevada's only alpine lakes.
White Mountain

White Mountain

The forest includes over 100 miles of the Appalachian Trail, 48 peaks more than 4,000 feet in elevation, a number of downhill ski areas and 600 miles of rivers and streams … many of which hold native brook trout.
Little Mountain

Little Mountain

This habitat of badlands, aspen groves and pine forests – simultaneously rugged and fragile – is one of Wyoming’s most sought after hunting grounds for mule deer and elk, and holds intimate streams that shelter Colorado River cutthroat trout.
North Umpqua

North Umpqua

The North Umpqua flows 110 miles from its headwaters in the Cascade Mountains (near Crater Lake National Park) to its confluence with the mainstem Umpqua west of Roseburg, in southwest Oregon.
Thompson Divide

Thompson Divide

The Thompson Divide encompasses 221,000 acres of public land within the White River National Forest in Pitkin, Garfield and Mesa counties, just south of the Roaring Fork Valley in west-central Colorado.
Smith River

Smith River

Amongst anglers, the Smith (a designated Blue Ribbon fishery) is renowned for its oversize brown and rainbow trout. Yet many among the 1,200 parties lucky enough to draw a river permit (from over 10,000 a year who apply) may not even bother to string a rod.

Check back over the next thirty days to see the places we chose from Washington, Colorado, West Virginia, Georgia, Wisconsin, Virginia, Tennessee, Wyoming, Michigan, Maine, California, Massachusetts, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alaska, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and New Hampshire.

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